Uni Watch Father’s Day 2022: Our Dads in Uniform

By Phil Hecken

For the past nine years it has been my privilege and pleasure to run photographs of our fathers dressed in uniforms — whether they be sports uniforms, military uniforms, or any other uniform. The response was overwhelmingly positive, and I’m pleased to again run this feature. This year, like last, I let readers know they could submit photos of their dads, grandpappys and uncles.

Once again, it’s a rich panoply of photos and stories. As always, this one-day special tribute post will stand alone (no uni news, no tweaks, no scoreboard, no ticker), and I hope everyone enjoys this, even if you didn’t submit this year.

Happy Father’s Day (and Juneteenth) everyone!

• • • • •

Robert Andrews

Hello Phil…

This is my grandfather, Manual Andrews. He served with the 2nd Division in 1917 thru 1919 as an infantryman and then as part of the ‘occupying forces’ in Germany during and after WWI. His backstory is a remarkable one and too long to fit this space but it includes being a stowaway from the Azores and landing in Key West, working his way back to New Bedford Ma.and talking his way into the US Army as an underage 16 year old circa 1916. His Army unit fought the Battle of Belleau Wood where he was wounded and suffered damaged lungs due to mustard gas which bothered him for the rest of his life. Following the Armistice he was assigned to a farm in the German countryside where he met the girl who later became his wife, my grandmother. He returned to the States in 1919, sent for her and her mother, and worked as a pipe-fitter in the Brooklyn Navy Yard for almost 40 years. His second job was spoiling me rotten while we lived with them in Brooklyn in the 50s and early 60s. I’m proud of what he made of his life and am happy to share his story with the UW community.

-Bob Andrews

• • • • •

Thomas Roddy

Hi Phil,

The enclosed photo is my brother and I with my dad (who passed suddenly in 2018), circa 1990. Although this was not an official uniform for work or organized sport, these were our outfits we wore to listen to the Patriots on the radio. Pre-1994 when the Patriots rarely sold out, it was our tradition to dress this way and listen to the games on the radio on our porch because my mother couldn’t stand the yelling…remember, the Patriots were dreadful in the early 90s. For Christmas that year, Dad got us hoodies that matched his, but for the life of me, I can’t find the picture of us all matching, but this will have to do, I guess!

• • • • •

Jason Gomez

Phil

This is my Dad, Carlos “Chuck” Gomez. This was taken before he left for Vietnam in 1966. He served in the US Army, 4th ID, then after he returned home, joined the National Guard. Dad was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri, so he was all about the A’s then the Royals and the Chiefs. We lost him to covid in January 2021, he is missed everyday. My Dad was a 2nd generation Army Vet, both my grandfathers served in the Army during WWII, and I carried on that tradition in Iraq.

Thank you for doing this!

Jason Gomez

P.S. I have a collage of my Dad and Grandfathers in their uniforms. I attached it in case you use this picture with the write up from my previous email.

• • • • •

Tommy Timon

My dad, 1st Lt Tom Timon, Sr. He was a Vietnam veteran who loved baseball and all things Cleveland sports. His favorite thing to do was sit on his back porch and listen to the Guardians on the radio with a cold beer. He passed away on Veterans Day 2019. Miss him every day.

• • • • •

Ron Ruelle

Hi, Phil!

A few years ago you published a photo of my dad, Don Ruelle, in his Navy uniform. While his stint in the military was brief due to a medical condition, he did appear in uniform in the mid 1990s in the Cookeville, Tennessee, summer theater production of South Pacific as Stewpot.

Thanks
Ron Ruelle

• • • • •

Munch Suchland

My dad, Spec/4 Michael Suchland, US Army 1968-1969, 3rd Armored Division. As part of the Cold War, Dad was stationed in Germany where they kept an eye on Russia as well as maintained and repaired tanks that came over from the war in Vietnam. He often talked about “survivors guilt” since he never had to experience the war but recently has accepted his good fortune and his fate. He is a hero to his seven children and his 20 grandchildren.

Munch Suchland

• • • • •

Frank Seitz

Phil

This is my Dad, FRANK SEITZ, Sr. at a family Christmas Party in the mid-late 80s. He had the rather unique habit of undoing his clip on tie and first couple of button on his duty shirt when he was on his dinner break (he worked swing shift for the Baltimore County Police and his sector included our neighborhood). Dad wasn’t much on ties and was happy when the department did away with them in the duty uniform right before he retired in the mid 90s. I wish I had more pictures of him in uniform but this really shows him as a person. Thanks.

Frank Seitz

• • • • •

Robert Brashear

Robert S. Brashear. world war II

• • • • •

Dan Hardin

I have attached a photo of the “M&K Football Squad” of Rock Island, Illinois, with the ball dated 1904. My grandfather, Conrad Mell, is the second player from the left in the top row. He would have been 18 at the time. I believe that M&K was a clothing store, assumption based on a 1918 newspaper ad that I found online.

I wish I knew more, he died in 1937, 15 years before I was born, I would have loved to be able to ask him about it.

Dan Hardin

Austin, Texas

• • • • •

Jay Jones

Phil,

Please find attached a photo of my dad.

My father, Johnny Jones, was a US Army paratrooper at 17 years old. He served in Korea toward the end of the conflict, from late 1952 through 1953. Being a minor, my grandfather had to sign a waiver to allow him to serve. My dad’s family was poor tenant farmers in Spalding County, Georgia. The story goes that dad enlisting meant one less mouth to feed and a chance for better opportunities in the Army. After Korea, he bounced around – airplane mechanic, truck driver, HVAC repair, and eventually a long career as a union pipefitter. He passed away in 2015.

Thanks,

Jay Jones

• • • • •

Ronnie Poore

Hi Phil,

attached is a photo of my dad Henry Poore in his Lebanon High School baskeball uniform 1953.

Ronnie Poore
Greenville SC

• • • • •

Christopher Hickey

Phil:

Thank you for coming up with and continuing this feature…one of the best on Uni Watch.

I’m sharing a photo of my dad, the late Dr. John S. Hickey, MD, taken in the late 1940’s outside my grandfather’s corner rowhome/doctor’s office in Mayfair (NE Philly). Dad returned from his service in the US Navy after WW2 …he wore the uniform of the SeeBees…and followed in his father’s footsteps to become a general practice physician. Soon after meeting/marrying my mom, they purchased an end-of-row of their own in the same neighborhood and, like his father, converted the basement into an office; above they raised 11 (yes, 11!) children. In addition to rendering care at his office, he also spent time treating hospitalized patients, made time for house calls, and served as the team doctor for the Father Judge High School (Crusaders) football team for over 20 years.

Team Hickey misses him each day, remembers him today, and thanks you for providing this special way to share him with the comm-uni-ty.

ChrisH

• • • • •

William Quinn

This photo of my dad was taken in 1937 in Niagara Falls, N.Y., when he would have turned 14. He loved being a catcher and idolized Yankees backstop Bill Dickey, maybe in large part to sharing a first name. He went on to be a three-sport athlete (baseball, basketball and football) at Holy Cross College and a Navy Captain during World War II, truly part of The Greatest Generation. He passed in 2002 and I still miss talking sports with him.

• • • • •

Scott Pendergraft

Hi Phil.

First time long time. Attached is a photo of my late father, Wayne Pendergraft (left), in his Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) basketball uniform from about 1936. He was stationed at CCC Co. 737, Prairie Creek Camp in Orick, California at the time. Tremendous man, athlete, and most of all, father. He is dearly missed and remembered fondly.

Thanks for all you do!

Scott Pendergraft
Salem, Oregon

• • • • •

Eric Lovejoy

My dad passed away just about five years ago in the coming weeks. With Father’s Day and the anniversary of his death approaching, along with his birthday shortly after, it’s a difficult time of year for me. He wore many uniforms in life, some he really liked, others not so much, but some of those helped provide for our family and allowed us kids to do many fun things. I miss him very much. Happy Father’s Day Dad.

Regards,
Eric Lovejoy

• • • • •

John Kimmerlein

Phil,

Thanks for putting together the Fathers Day lede-always a favorite.

Here’s a photo of my father in uniform during the Korean War. From a pure uni-perspective, the wool Ike jacket he’s wearing in this photo is really nice and has held up incredibly well. We used to wear it as kids and one of my brothers still has it.

John

• • • • •

David Eichblatt

Not my father, but it is me with my two older sons at Ft Benning, GA

Dave Eichblatt

• • • • •

Will Scheibler

My dad, then age 79, organized a team of primarily local hockey players to play in the 70+ age group (oldest one) of the Snoopy’s Senior World Hockey Tournament back in 2017. He unfortunately was unable to play but traveled down to Santa Rosa for the tournament. He’s the one the red arrow is pointing to.

They ended up winning the 70B division.

• • • • •

Jaime Galindo

Here’s a photo of my dad during his senior year of high school. He graduated in 1965. He played on the offensive line. A funny thing is that the yearbook has his name reversed. It’s actually Galdino Galindo. When added to the fact that he gave my brother the same name, confusion still arises to this day.

Thanks for doing this every year.

Jaime Galindo

• • • • •

Steven Whitney

Phil,

A photo for the Uni-Watch Father’s Day.

This is a photo of my daughter (Taylor) and I. We took it last Thanksgiving during a visit to her Squadron at Offutt AFB.

Thanks for doing this.

v/r,

Steve
STEVEN WHITNEY, Brig Gen, USSF

• • • • •

Tom Dunphy

Hi Phil and Paul,

My submission. Thanks for all you do.

Here’s my dad, Joe Dunphy, with my ‘Nana’ Grimes (not my ‘real’ grandma but a family friend he emigrated to from Waterford Ireland in 1950.) He promptly enlisted and was injured badly in the Korean War (hit by a flamethrower!) Convalesced in VA hospitals in Tokyo and Boston before returning to Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Met my mom Caroline soon thereafter – Nana ‘knew some Waterford girls up in the Bronx.’ He managed supermarkets – ran the ‘flagship’ Finast on W. 57th Street and Ninth Ave. for years — before opening his own liquor store in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx. Pretty dapper!

-Tom Dunphy

• • • • •

Michael Emody

Hi, Phil!

Here’s a photo of my dad in the U.S. Navy during WW2. He was on a supply or support ship, I don’t remember the name.

Hope you can use it. Thanks.

Michael Emody

• • • • •

Jeff Lewandowski

This is a photo of my dad at Orioles spring training in Leesburg, Florida in 1962. He never did make it to the majors but I’m proud of his accomplishments as a baseball player and as a father. Happy Fathers Day dad!

Love, Jeff

• • • • •

Jimmy Corcoran

Hard to believe it’s been more than fifty years since my mother, sister, and I spent a week of our summer vacation watching my father blow his last chance to play in the NFL with the Eagles. Every day at practice my father and coach Jerry Williams would go at it, The King didn’t like number 7, he wouldn’t touch his toes during calisthenics or do full jumping jacks and of course the nail in the coffin that had to have them separated by players, my father asked him for dry footballs. I also got on the King’s bad side one day, he introduced me to the QB’s the first day, the next day a QB named Rick Arrington remembered me and walked over and gave me his wrist bands. I thought that was great and wore them to the next practice, when I told my father look what number 11 gave me, he said “I can’t believe you are wearing Arrington’s wrist bands Jimbo, he’s my competition!” …Ah the memories. Happy Father’s Day

Jimmy Corcoran

• • • • •

Paul Muckler

Hello Phil,

Thank you for this opportunity to run my father’s photo (attached).

This is my dad, Edward Muckler, wearing his Army uniform at home on leave in Pleasantville, NY, sometime in late summer 1951. Also in the picture is his dog, Jackson. This was shortly before my dad shipped out for Korea. My father always remarked that on their way to Korea, the pilot announced the news about Bobby Thomson’s “Shot Heard ’round the World” to the troops onboard. During those years my father was a Brooklyn Dodgers fan…

Again, thank you for your time – much appreciated,

Paul Muckler
Oak Creek, Wisconsin

• • • • •

Don Norwood

This is my father, Jimmy Norwood. He was a captain in the U.S. Army when I was born (Fort Benning; hence the infantry school patch). He was a dentist, marathoner, cyclist, HS football down marker guy (who got paid with a new pair of shoes each year), Southern Gospel singer, and artist. He was also the best dad anyone could have and my best friend. He died last September at the age of 79. He was one of a kind.

Don Norwood
Silsbee, TX

• • • • •

JD Director

While some might say, “hang on, that’s no uniform,” I beg to differ. These salesmen (my dad among them, top row on the right) were indeed wearing the “uniform” of the day (c. 1964-65). Can’t help but bring a smile to my face (my dad wore a uniform in WWII, but this . . . ).

• • • • •

Doug Keklak

My grandparents on their wedding day (he served in the Army).

Kek

• • • • •

Jeff Ash

This is my favorite picture of my dad, Ray Ash, in the service. This probably is 1946, so he’d have been 21. Dad ran an enlisted men’s club in Vegesack, Germany, after World War II ended. He made sure there was plenty of Coca-Cola, beer, cigarettes and 45s for the jukebox. It was near Bremen, about 25 miles from the North Sea.

Thanks,
Jeff Ash
Green Bay, WI

• • • • •

David Staples

This is my father, Cpl. George W. Staples Jr. He served in the USMC and fought in the Korean War. He was a Purple Heart recipient.

David M Staples
UCF Knight & Hufflepuff

• • • • •

James Gilbert

Here’s a pic of my father (L) and his brother in a Feb. ’45 textile mill newsletter.

Thanks for doing this every year.

Cheers,

James

• • • • •

Bob Wilmot

Phil:

My dad, Pete Wilmot, passed away in December at age 93. He was a 30-year Army officer, and a leader all his life. He started in Armor, then moved into Intelligence, then Special Forces – earning a Green Beret at age 40. We have many photos of him in his Army uniforms, but recently we found college photos. He played football at Penn Military College (now Widener University), Class of ’51. He also boxed and played baseball. This photo, though, shows him in his physical prime, ready to do some damage from either side of the line.

Keep up the good work!

Bob Wilmot

• • • • •

Howard Bosworth

Good Morning Phil

Thanks for running feature yet again this coming Fathers Day

John Snyder was my step dad. He was a good man and welcomed me when he and my mother were married and blended families.

We watched a lot of sports on TV, especially the Knicks and he told me about his beloved RPI hockey team where he graduated school.

I miss him very much.

Happy Fathers to all

Howard Bosworth

• • • • •

That’s all for 2022! Thanks to all who submitted and as always, this was another wonderful way to honor our dads on Father’s Day. Stay safe everyone, have a great Dad’s Day and Juneteenth and I’ll catch you next weekend.

Peace,

PH

9 comments to Uni Watch Father’s Day 2022: Our Dads in Uniform

  • Martin Hick | June 19, 2022 at 8:18 am | · Reply

    JD Director, please tell me your dad sold globes.

    • JD Director | June 19, 2022 at 11:39 am | · Reply

      Globes? I’m left to ponder on that one. No, not globes but photographic equipment and cameras.

  • Martin Hick | June 19, 2022 at 12:03 pm | · Reply

    I hope my reference to The Globesman on Documentary Now did not offend. It’s a parody of The Salesman.
    Anyways…
    That uniform is a look I’ve always liked. And don to this day.
    Thanks for the pic of your pop.

    • JD Director | June 19, 2022 at 1:39 pm | · Reply

      No offense even remotely taken. Watched episodes of that series, but not that one. Required viewing tonight, I’d say. It is indeed a look I associate with my father for many years (tho he got “groovier” in the ’70s. . . ) Thanks.

  • Greg Lamm | June 19, 2022 at 12:56 pm | · Reply

    Thanks everyone, great job as always. Happy Father’s Day to everyone and Happy Juneteenth as well. Miss you, Dad.

  • Hitchen | June 19, 2022 at 5:57 pm | · Reply

    Interesting kit today: NY/NJ Gotham FC wore a version of their white jersey for pregame warmups with an intricate design in the sash on the front of the jersey. I was unable to discern whether it was a Pride or a Juneteenth shoutout.

  • ChrisH | June 19, 2022 at 9:00 pm | · Reply

    Thanks to everyone who shared today-and of course thanks to Phil!
    Great tributes…and great uniforms!

  • Ingmar | June 20, 2022 at 4:19 am | · Reply

    You know, this wonderful Father’s Day feature deserves a book on the subject. This tradition on Uni Watch is very nice, but I would love to have these pictures and stories in a book. Grew up without a father, I am the proud father of three sons and I love these stories.

  • Mike Obie | June 21, 2022 at 2:31 pm | · Reply

    I saw that street sign that said Unruh Ave, and knew it HAD to be Mayfair. I live not far from there! Happy Belated Fathers Day to all!!

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